What’s the plan then Stan?

Some time ago, I blogged about the benefits of writing your own training plan, rather than just following a set one that you can get from the internet. You can see this post here if you are interested. – Why you should write your own training plan.

In a break with tradition, I have decided to follow my own advice and have created my own training plan for SDW100. Following the always brilliant advice of Jason Koop, my initial focus will be on interval work to try to increase my VO2 max and also improve my overall running speed.

I have always been a slow runner, having come from zero running background and only picking up all this exercising malarkey in my mid 30’s I was starting from a less than strong position. Whilst running 100 miles is not about running fast, increased VO2 max will allow me to run quicker at a lower overall heart rate, which is vital to being able to sustain a decent pace for the 24-30 hours it is likely to take me to complete the 100 mile race.

Tortoise v Hare | When2Pray

After a short phase of interval work (about 5 weeks) I will be moving onto “tempo” runs, where I increase pace during a normal run to a “comfortably uncomfortable” pace and for 10 minutes or longer, then drop back to normal speed. Again this is designed to improve my running speed overall and to push my body to adapt to running more quickly over longer distances.

7 or so weeks of this, then we are into the final phase where I start to piggyback two long runs together, running perhaps 2 hours on a Saturday then 3 or 4 on a Sunday to help develop the longer range stamina. At this point, I will be only training on trails similar to the South Downs Way, will have to include a decent chunk of night time work to practice running in the dark and I will also be running at some very strange times in the day (2am starts, 4am starts etc) to help me get used to running when tired.

These longer runs will also be done carrying all the kit I will be needing on race day, again to help me adapt.

The overall idea of all of this is that I approach race day used to the terrain, used to running on tired legs, used to the darkness and the weight of the kit, whilst being able to maintain a quicker pace at a lower heart rate.

That’s the idea anyway. Am still very far from convinced that 20 weeks is enough time to get fit enough for this. Luckily I do hold a trump card. My ability to tolerate pain seems to be higher than most people and I am also extremely stubborn.

Despite breaking 3 ribs after only 6 miles of the Race to the King (which is 53 miles in total) I carried on and completed the race in a decent time. That was agony, I was only able to take in about a quarter breath and every time my foot hit the ground my ribs sent shooting pain through my chest. Admittedly I didn’t realise I had broken 3 ribs until I found myself in A&E the day after the race, but the fact remains that if I can battle through that, I should be able to battle through whatever 100 miles of the South Downs has to throw at me on November 7th.

Only time will tell I guess. Put in 20 weeks of decent training, make it to the start line with no injuries and then see how I get on.

Should be fun.

TTFN – Snooky

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